Thanks to the Ron Paul Curriculum and Ray’s Arithmetic, This Girl LOVES Math!

Here is a great example of what happens when you take a classic mathematics program like Ray’s Arithmetic and fuse it with a powerful online platform like the Ron Paul Curriculum.

You get successes like the one of this young lady named Hailey.

Listen to her story:

Hailey formerly went to public school.  She hated math.

She tells us why as succinctly as any third or fourth grader could say it: Common Core was “like a locked gate” keeping her cruelly barred from the tranquil gardens of mathematics understanding.

But once her parents removed her from the labyrinthine confines of the public school classrooom and enrolled her in the Ron Paul Curriculum, that locked gate was opened, and she was then able to enter into the lush garden of math understanding.  Now she understands it.

Now she “gets it.”  Now she LOVES it!

For Hailey, math is no longer this mysterious mythology constructed by academic theoreticians, who only succeeded in confusing and befuddling her through Common Core.

Now, math is the bright, clear path of simple, beginning arithmetic that it should be.  Now it is a more level and straight path for her to follow.  For this hopeful young scholar, liberation came in the form of an old-fashioned approach to teaching and learning math called Ray’s Arithmetic.

This story has been repeated, I’m sure, numerous times by students whose parents have enrolled them in one of the Ray’s Arithmetic-based courses that are offered at Ron Paul Curriculum.  Beginning arithmetic is taught in Math 1, Math 2, Math 3 and Math 4.  And so far, I’m very pleased with the response that these courses have been receiving.

Something tells me, there are a lot more Haileys out there!

Grade 4 Math: Update!

4thgradeThere I was, merrily rolling along through Ray’s Primary Arithmetic lessons when, suddenly,. . . without warning, . . . The Call came.

Actually, it was an e-mail.

Actually it was a series of e-mails.

First, it was the director of curriculum development asking me to do some high school Algebra lessons (online screencasts like the ones on this site) using Ray’s textbooks.

Then, it was the director of curriculum development asking me to do some primary-grade school math lessons using Ray’s textbooks, and fuggetabout Algebra.  At least for now.

Time was of the essence and the curriculum course offerings were going to be expanding next Fall (2015) to include the primary grade levels and not just middle school and high school.

And TOP priority was given to Grade 4 math.  That is the level most likely to be requested in greater numbers by families and parents next Fall.

As Shaggy would say to Scooby and the gang, Zoicks!

That meant that the video lessons for these grades — especially Grade 4 — had to be done RIGHT NOW.

Ray’s Intellectual Arithmetic, here we come.

NO TIME LIKE THE PRESENT

Why is this important to you?

Well, because it means that I have had to shift gears, actually grade levels, to meet this hard-and-fast deadline which is fast approaching and coming at us like a freight train: August-September enrollment next year.

Hundreds of new primary-school students are expected to be enrolling in the newly expanded curriculum course offerings.  Especially the newly expanded math course offerings.

And this means that that scarcest of resources — time — has had to be reallocated to accommodate this very TALL order.

Lessons will continue to be created for this site, HOWEVER, in smaller quantities and at a slower pace.

THE END GAME

My goal is to work through Ray’s Arithmetic books one by one.  That is a long-term goal.  The results, when all is said and done, will be a selection of video lessons that are offered here, as well as a complete and fully developed mathematics course for each grade level that will be offered elsewhere.

For now, that “elsewhere” is the Ron Paul Curriculum.

Later on, as things unfold, who knows, that “elsewhere” could be . . . elsewhere!

The project is still in its infant stages.  Patience is definitely a virtue with math.  It is even more of a virtue with video math.  On both the production side and the “consumption” side.

I hope and pray that this endeavor, in all of its evolving iterations and digital incarnations, will bear much fruit, and ultimately lead to a useful academic and intellectual harvest for some small portion of the next generation of learners — and leaders!

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